Tag Archive | Community

Savour the moment with Jackson Triggs

Wine, Music, Vintage, Classy, Fun, Whimsical, Entertainment, Relaxing, Welcoming,  Niagara

These are words that come to mind after visiting the online ‘face’ of Jackson Triggs Winery.  Whether it is their official Website or presence on other social media sites; such as Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, and YouTube, they have a similar message to it’s viewers.

After watching their most recent television commercial, I couldn’t resist learning more about this company.

Intrigued?  Then watch, and read on…

Jackson-Triggs was established as a winery in 1993.  Their name is a blend of their founders’  – Allan Jackson and Don Triggs.  The main winery is located in Niagara-On-The-Lake, and a second in the Okanagan – Oliver, British Columbia.  Four beautiful vineyards support these wineries:  2 in Niagara (Niagara Estate, Delaine Vineyard) and 2 in the Okanagan (Okanagan Estate, SunRock Vineyard).  The architecture of the buildings, the manicured grounds of the estates, the beautiful pungent smells of the grapes fermenting on the vines in the summer months are all part of the atmosphere at Jackson Triggs.

Behind their product and services, they continue to offer  “unwavering dedication to quality, value and tradition” to their customers.  This is obvious through their Internationally award winning wines that are cultivated to ‘perfection’ by a team of experienced wine makers.  Their services reach beyond their wines, which offers their customers an extended experience. Their outdoor amphitheatre offers an eclectic assortment of music with various artists performing during the summer.  This unique investment attracts award winning artists and substantial media recognition.  Also offered are  special events, dining, tours, and wine tasting on the patio.  Stimulating all the senses with the hope that their customers will remember well, and want to return again and again.

Who are their customers?  

“Glocalization” , is a niche marketing word that they embody: A business catering to a local market as well as a global one.  Global tourism is strong in Niagara.  With Niagara-On-The-Lake only minutes from the world renowned Niagara Falls, it has the added benefit of those visiting the Falls to extend their visit to the winery.  Significant challenges for Niagara tourism:  Canadian dollar is almost at par which means our American neighbours don’t have the same incentive to come north. As well, a depressed economic situation means less disposable income.

On a happier note, Canadian wineries can now celebrate the passing of bill C-311.  C-311 is law, passed this month,  that allows wineries to sell their wine between provinces: Either purchasing wine from a winery and then travelling home to another province, or through online purchases.

Company needs to give back to it’s community

And I don’t mean just through engagement with it’s online community (upcoming blog, stay tuned) but give back through CSR (Corporate Social Responsibility) projects.  Jackson Triggs’  auctioned off best-seat tickets to their Summer Concert Series on eBay.  All proceeds went to support War Child’s work with children whose lives have been devastated by war.  (Pretty great, don’t you think?)

As for their social business? Are customers talking about them?  Are they sharing this excitement?

Social Business Blog Series:

Note:  This series is for a “Social Media for Public Relations” course at McMaster University.  I am not an expert on wineries, but definitely enjoy my wine.  I live in Niagara and have a passion for health, wellness & community.  To read more about my experience, please read my about section.  All references and images in this blog are from the Jackson Triggs Winery website or otherwise noted.

Social Media part of Halton’s Emergency Plan

   

 

In an interview with Nick Buczynsky, Community Emergency Management Coordinator at Halton Region,

I had a chance to find out first hand how one of our local regions is using Social Media to support their Emergency Management program.

Can you tell us a little bit about your job as Community Emergency Management Coordinator at Halton Region?

As the CEMC for Halton Region, I am responsible for coordinating the Region’s emergency management program, with emphasis on preparedness, training, public education and awareness, and emergency response.

How are you using Social Media to support your role?

Using a dedicated Twitter account, we tweet messages on emergency preparedness to help educate the public.  Related messaging on incidents or events that may be occurring are also tweeted.  Where we know of a potential situation, such as severe weather, we will tweet messages advising residents of how to prepare themselves for it.  In specific emergency situations, we will tweet about the incident, any actions that residents should take, and link to the Region’s website for more information.

How long have you been using social media in your role?

Since August 2011.

What tools / platforms do you use?  i.e. Twitter, Facebook.  and Why did you choose these platforms?

Currently we are only using Twitter.  It is fast and convenient and message penetration can grow exponentially in no time.

Challenges  – you have faced using Social Media in your role?

Time dedicated to sending tweets had been a challenge, although with new staff this issue has diminished. Another challenge has been building up the number of dedicated followers.  Although our initial goal was extremely modest and we have exceeded it significantly, I would like to see the number of followers in the thousands rather than the low hundreds.

Benefits – you have faced using Social Media in your role?

It has proven to be a good tool for following events – especially where we are not able to get much information from the site directly.

Is there a specific story that you can share where Social Media made a significant impact on your ability to communicate during a disaster / emergency event?  How?

Just  days after we launched Twitter, a very small tornado blew through Burlington.  By tweeting Environment Canada warnings and our own tips on what to do in a tornado, power outages, lightning storms, etc., we quickly picked up a handful of followers – without having done any marketing, public education or even a media release/announcement that we have launched Twitter.  That set the tone for future growth although, thankfully, we have not had a similar situation occur again to date.

If you can make one statement on the greatest impact social media has had on emergency management, what would that be?  What would you like to see in the near future for your industry?

I think that social media has given emergency management professionals another valuable tool for relaying real-time or near real-time information on emergencies and other signficant events to potentially thousands of individuals directly.

Do you have anything you would like to share with our class here at McMaster University #SMRTCCE about how Social Media has impacted Emergency Management?

Thanks for the opportunity to share Halton’s experience with using social media in emergency management.  I see it has great potential for communicating key messages to residents in a timely manner and can penetrate a large part of the community in little time once the number of followers grows.

Please check us out on Twitter – @BPreparedHalton

Halton Region Website

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Community Matters

Working and living in a small community all my life has shown me the value that our neighbors, friends, local businesses, etc have in our lives.  Even with the world of technology becoming more a part of our lives, it does not take the place of people needing and wanting to be with other people.  History shows the importance of creating strong connections with people:  within our immediate familiar circles and those on the ‘other side of the bridge’.   Community is important to all of us in one way, shape or form.

What are we doing in the area of  Marketing, Public Relations and Communications that is affecting our society – small and large. What tools do we have today to support our communities communicate with one another and within the group?  Who is making a difference in our communities and why?  What is happening in the world today that affects us?  What can we learn from historical communities?  Tips & Testimonials.

My experience comes from almost 20 years in small town retail, traditional education in Business & Public Relations, and my life as a small town ‘gal’.

Small businesses, Government, Recreational Activities, Families, Education, Environmental and Healthcare all play a part in the well-being of our society.  It will take true transparency, authenticity, effort & compassion from everyone -organizations and individuals –  to make a our communities thrive  Let’s  learn, let’s live and let’s leave behind greatness in our communities.